Saturday, October 8, 2016

Inglewood Open Studios
Tour Celebrates Its Tenth Year! Saturday, November 12 & Sunday, November 13, 2016. 12pm-5pm

Inglewood Open Studios Celebrates its Tenth Year! Saturday, November 12th and Sunday November 13,2016 12pm - 5pm

For Immediate Release:  


 Inglewood Open Studios
Tour Celebrates Its Tenth Year!
Saturday, November 12 & Sunday, November 13, 2016. 12pm-5pm
   

LOS ANGELES, CA – Inglewood has become the fastest growing artist community in Los Angeles. It is also the fastest growing city, undergoing daily changes for and around the NFL stadium, Hollywood Park Casino, along new Metro lines and downtown Inglewood. The tenth annual Inglewood Open Studios tour will showcase the impressive depth and talent of this community on the weekend of November 12-13, from 12:00 to 5:00pm both days. As always, Inglewood Open Studios remains an artist run event, co-organized by local non profit Inglewood Cultural Arts (ICA).

On both Saturday November 12 and Sunday, November 13, Inglewood artists will open their studios to the public, inviting visitors to personally tour their private working spaces and enjoy art created in all media--drawing, painting, sculpture, mixed-media, photography, print making, installation, video and performance.

To mark our 10th year anniversary, co-founder Renée Fox will curate a group show of 2016 Inglewood Open Studios artist participants at Residency gallery, a new gallery in Inglewood, managed by Rick Garzon. With its second exhibition about to open, Residency has already had reviews in Contemporary Art Review la (also known as CARLA) and Artillery. The group show will serve as stop #1 on the tour route, and, as a preview of art that can be seen on the tour. Group show dates: Saturday, November 12 through Wednesday, November 16 with a closing reception on November 16 from 6-9PM.

An official map with Inglewood Open Studios location details will be available online, at Residency gallery and at all artist studio locations on the tour. For additional information on Inglewood Open Studios, including the printable tour map, please visit  www.inglewoodopenstudios.com Free shuttle transportation will also be provided by the City of Inglewood.

Participating Artists -
Inglewood Open Studios participants include both established and emerging artists. The 2016 Inglewood Open Studios artists are listed in alphabetical order:

Adrienne Adar
Susan Amorde
Brian Biedul
Martin Bruinsma
Kelly Brumfield-Woods
Darel Carey
Matthew Carey
Anne Cheek La Rose
Joyce Dallal
Bibi Davidson
Beth Dubber
Martin Durazo
Renee Fox
Sue Francis
Calida Garcia Rawles
Michael Giancristiano
Nancy Jo Haselbacher
Shelly Heffler
Astrelle Johnquest
Michael Massenburg
Christopher L. Mercier
David Newcombe
Lindsey Nobel
Kenneth Ober
Toni Reinis
Joan Robey
Alexandra Rose
Dawn Rosenquist
Karen Sikie
Stan Smith
ZinShu Spock, 
Ernie Steiner
Holly Tempo
Sidney Tuggerson, Jr.
Ginger Van Hook
Luke Van Hook
MonaLisa Whitaker
Exceptional Children's Foundation (29 artists)

Inglewood, CA -

Photo by Ginger Van Hook©2012
Inglewood, CA -
Photo by Ginger Van Hook©
Inglewood is nestled in the center of Los Angeles County. Bordered by the LAX International Airport, it is in close proximity to Otis College of Art and Design and is surrounded by the cities of Culver City, El Segundo, Marina Del Rey, Westchester, and Torrance.




Inglewood Cultural Arts -
Inglewood Cultural Arts, Inc. (ICA), functions as fiscal receiver and co-organizer for the Inglewood Open Studios. ICA is an independent, multidisciplinary nonprofit arts organization serving residents of Inglewood and surrounding communities. ICA's mission is to enhance the quality of life in the community by providing diverse cultural arts programs. www.inglewoodculturalarts.org 



Van Hook Foundation-
Van Hook Foundation (VHF) is the media sponsor for the Inglewood Open Studios and may be contacted for additional information. 
VHF is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization founded in Inglewood and located at the Beacon Arts Building Gallery 1D.
The Van Hook Foundation’s mission is to promote the merging of fine art and science through the curating, jurying, installation and mounting of artistic, educational and scientific exhibitions for the public and to Promote Visibility of the Local Arts Communities in Los Angeles and surrounding areas.  vanhookfoundation.blogspot.com, www.gingervanhook.com, www.lukevanhook.com, gingersartjournal.blogspot.com


For additional information, please contact press liaison Ginger Van Hook at gingervanhook@gmail.com

Tuesday, October 18, 2011

Ginger's Art Journal Features FINE ART TREKKIN in cities near you!

The FINE ART TREKKIN series of blogs represents specific communities in the Los Angeles, California Area, as well as the United States. 

We are here to represent the FACTS about the Fine Art Community as documentary records. (F.A.C.T.S) PLEASE NOTE THAT WE ARE NOT A POLITICAL ORGANIZATION, nor do we cover politics, news, religion or crime beats. 

FINE ART COMMUNITY TREKKIN SERIES of blogs seeks to provide a documentary slice of our culture as it exists in the new millennium, after the year 2000.

WE ONLY REPRESENT THE INTERESTS OF ARTISTS IN THE FINE ARTS FOR SPECIFIC ART EVENTS with the permissions from the artists to promote their work.

The FINE ART COMMUNITY TREKKIN SERIES© of Blogs is licensed and copyrighted to Ginger Van Hook© as of  2008. This series of documentary works is also licensed and copyrighted on YOU TUBE as videos by EnildeVanHook©. 
THANK YOU for reading about our artworks and artists!


ARCADIA     http://finearttrekkinarcadia.blogspot.com/


INGLEWOOD        http://finearttrekkininglewood.blogspot.com/


MONROVIA http://finearttrekkinmonrovia.blogspot.com/


PASADENA  http://finearttrekkinpasadena.blogspot.com/


TORRANCE           http://finearttrekkintorrance.blogspot.com/


SOUTHBAY           http://finearttrekkinsouthbay.blogspot.com/


SANTA MONICA  http://finearttrekkinsantamonica.blogspot.com/


LITTLE TOKYO    http://finearttrekkinlittletokyola.blogspot.com/


VENICE BEACH   http://finearttrekkinvenicebeach.blogspot.com/


CULVER CITY      http://finearttrekkinculvercity.blogspot.com/


LOS ANGELES      http://finearttrekkinlosangeles.blogspot.com/


USC                         http://finearttrekkinusc.blogspot.com/



HUNTINGTON BEACH   http://finearttrekkinhuntingtonbeach.blogspot.com/


POMONA                            http://finearttrekkinpomona.blogspot.com/


BEVERLY HILLS              http://finearttrekkinbeverlyhills.blogspot.com/


DOWN TOWN LA             http://finearttrekkindowntownla.blogspot.com/


SAN FRANCISCO             http://finearttrekkinsanfrancisco.blogspot.com/


WESTWOOD                      http://finearttrekkinwestwood.blogspot.com/


AT OTIS COLLEGE          http://finearttrekkinatotis.blogspot.com/


IN CHINA TOWN              http://finearttrekkinchinatown.blogspot.com/


HOLLYWOOD                   http://finearttrekkinhollywood.blogspot.com/


STUDIO CITY                    http://finearttrekkinstudiocity.blogspot.com/


GLENDALE                       http://finearttrekkinglendale.blogspot.com/


MIRACLE MILE LA          http://finearttrekkinmiraclemilela.blogspot.com/


AT VENICE BEACH         http://finearttrekkinatvenicebeach.blogspot.com/


AT VENICE                        http://finearttrekkinatvenice.blogspot.com/


VENICE BEACH                  http://finearttrekkinvenicebeach.blogspot.com/


NEAR USC                         http://finearttrekkinnearusc.blogspot.com/


NEAR UCLA                      http://finearttrekkinnearuscla.blogspot.com/


MID WILSHIRE                  http://finearttrekkinmidwilshirela.blogspot.com/


SAN DIEGO                       http://finearttrekkinsandiego.blogspot.com/


SEATTLE                           http://finearttrekkinseattle.blogspot.com/


NEVADA                           http://finearttrekkinnevada.blogspot.com/


OREGON                           http://finearttrekkinoregon.blogspot.com/


CALIFORNIA                   http://finearttrekkincalifornia.blogspot.com/


NEW YORK                      http://finearttrekkinnewyork.blogspot.com/

Wednesday, October 27, 2010

SEE THRU EXHIBITION OPENED 8.14.10 GALLERY 825 LOS ANGELES



THURSDAY, AUGUST 19, 2010

SEE THRU EXHIBITION OPENED 8.14.10 GALLERY 825 LOS ANGELES

Professor Shinsuke Shimojo of CalTech, 
a world-renowned researcher and expert in field of vision, 
perception and cognitive neuroscience inspired artists from LAAA/Gallery 825 
to create new work reflecting scientific principals 
exploring the intersection between photography, neuroscience and the arts.

Ann Marie Rousseau photographs Romann Weber for "Science and Surveillance" 
Photo by Ginger Van Hook 

SMALL GALLERY and MAIN GALLERY

Science and Surveillance
A.M.Rousseau

Description:
The work in this project plays off Shinsuke Shimojo’s studies on perception and the interplay of emotion, decision-making and consciousness.* Our eyes are constantly scanning our surroundings in rapid leaps, instantaneously accumulating information as they move several times per second, all without conscious effort or knowledge. Shimojo describes the “gaze cascade effect,” in which a subject's gaze between two objects under consideration gradually shifts to favor the object ultimately chosen.  Research has indicated that these gaze cascades, also called orienting, are deeply involved in higher-level brain functions such as decision making.

In experiments asking subjects to compare two faces and label one as either attractive or unattractive, Shimojo discovered that the more that someone looks at a particular face, the more he or she wants to look at it, and consequently the more likely it becomes that the face will be labeled as “attractive.”  This happens even before the viewer makes a conscious decision.  His research also found that the participants' judgments of attractiveness versus unattractiveness could be manipulated by limiting the length of time they were allowed to look at a particular face. According to Shimojo, the unconscious, spontaneous movements of the eyes work in concert and affect what are presumed to be more deliberate cognitive tasks when making choices.  

Various studies in cognitive and neuro sciences have demonstrated that images—of a face, for instance—and semantic contents such as verbal labels interact through various mechanisms in order to produce a stable and consistent interpretation of the image.  In today’s modern surveillance society, labeling occurs in myriad ways, both benign and nefarious.  This continual labeling has far broader scope and more serious consequences than ordinary judgments of "attractive" and "unattractive," but it is perhaps influenced by some of the same subliminal forces shown in Shimojo’s work.

The lineup of "perpetrators" in this installation shows faces with labels quite contrary to the presumed task of security surveillance, which aims to identify malefactors, terrorists, criminals, dangerous subjects and other potential wrongdoers. Instead these labels, which have been loosely extrapolated from the Buddhist tenets of the ten perfections, seek to discern those with traits most useful, beneficial, lasting and constructive for society.  Although these labels are essentially positive, the viewer cannot help but approach them with a consciousness of what it is to be watched and labeled specifically, and an appreciation of the complex tensions inherent in labeling in general.

•“Gaze bias both reflects and influences preference,” Shinsuke Shimojo, Claudiu Simion, Eiko Shimojo, & Christian Scheier, Nature Neuroscience, Advance online publication, 9 November 2003; doi:10.1038/nn1150



Romann Weber






Marcie Kaufmann


Ginger Van Hook


Elizabeth Tobias


Krista Kahl


Mei Xian Qiu


Meg Madison

Siri Kaur



Ching Ching Cheng



Shana Mabari

Krista Kahl and Ann Marie Rousseau


Krista Kahl, Mei Xian Qiu and Ann Marie Rousseau


Krista Kahl and Ginger Van Hook during the installation 
of Connection 1 and Connection 2. Photo by Ann Marie Rousseau


ASSEMBLE
Dori Atlantis, Ching-Ching Cheng, Meg Madison and Mei Xian Qiu
6' x 17' x 13'   Digital Photographs, Plexiglass, Monofilament     
Photo by Ann Marie Rousseau


Color Space
Ching-Ching Cheng
9"x9"x9" Urethane, Pigment Photo by Ann Marie Rousseau


Blue Volumetric
Yoichi Kawamura, Shana Mabari and Shinsuke Shimojo
42” x 42” x 42” Plexiglass Cube + Mixed Materials
Photo by Ann Marie Rousseau 




Color Space
Ching-Ching Cheng
9"x9"x9" Urethane, Pigment 
Photo by Ginger Van Hook



Blue Volumetric
Yoichi Kawamura, Shana Mabari and Shinsuke Shimojo
42” x 42” x 42” Plexiglass Cube + Mixed Materials (Photo by Ginger Van Hook)



Optic Chasm
Mei Xian Qiu
Dimensions Varied – Plexiglass Cube, Water, 
Used Motor Oil, Projector, Tempera. 
(Photo by Ginger Van Hook)








Luke Van Hook installs the "BRAIN" 8.14.10 Photo by Ginger Van Hook


The "Brain" by Luke Van Hook. Photo by Ginger Van Hook
























































GALLERY WINDOW

Connections 1, Connections 2
Krista Kahl
48”x 60" silver gelatin prints with india ink.
Price: $3200 ea.
Magnetic vinyl "Neurons" approx. 8x10" $40 each. (16 total)  Can be purchased individually or in sets.

Description:
Our urban environment is a by-product of our brains, our perceptions and ultimately our imagination. In this installation I share a glimpse of how I interpret the inner and outer connections of our brain to our environment, from micro to macro. Having an avid interest in astronomy, electricity and the inner workings of the mind I found it interesting how they are all intertwined. This idea began while I was driving around the city and trying to photograph the sky. I couldn't help but notice how the wires always seemed to get in the way. I started to obsess about them. The more I looked, the more I saw, until finally, instead of fighting to get rid of them I decided to include them in my photographs. I began to contemplate what exactly was going through all those wires.... visually, they are just black lines. But inside, it was obvious there was a whole other invisible world going on - a secret little communicative world of energy, electricity, sound and life. I realized this world was parallel to the inner workings of our brain, whether it is electrical impulses being transferred to our buildings and homes or electrical impulses being transferred through the neurons and synapses in our brain - it is all basically the same, depending on how you look at it.

I use black and white film and chemistry to capture the images, then draw lines extending onto the paper landscape and leave it to the viewer to imagine where these lines end. In the window, whimsical Neuron Creatures float through space; each one has it's own little life and is a part of the bigger whole.

SOUTH GALLERY

ASSEMBLE
Dori Atlantis, Ching-Ching Cheng, Meg Madison and Mei Xian Qiu
6' x 17' x 13'   Digital Photographs, Plexiglass, Monofilament     
Price: $4,000 total installation, photos available individually

Description:
ASSEMBLE explores the intersection of vision and perception through an installation that mimics the way congenitally blind people process information. Four artists have collaborated to dissect one photographic image into parts, fragments, slices, and pieces.  The resulting installation of images attempts to simulate the way a blind person must confront all experiences, in a detailed piece-by-piece examination to understand an object, person or environment.  ASSEMBLE also investigates the hierarchy of perception - by breaking apart one iconic photograph into bits and pieces leaving much of the final details to the mind of the viewer.


SMALL GALLERY

Science and Surveillance
A.M.Rousseau
Size, Medium
Price: 

Description:
The work in this project plays off Shinsuke Shimojo’s studies on perception and the interplay of emotion, decision-making and consciousness.* Our eyes are constantly scanning our surroundings in rapid leaps, instantaneously accumulating information as they move several times per second, all without conscious effort or knowledge. Shimojo describes the “gaze cascade effect,” in which a subject's gaze between two objects under consideration gradually shifts to favor the object ultimately chosen.  Research has indicated that these gaze cascades, also called orienting, are deeply involved in higher-level brain functions such as decision making.

In experiments asking subjects to compare two faces and label one as either attractive or unattractive, Shimojo discovered that the more that someone looks at a particular face, the more he or she wants to look at it, and consequently the more likely it becomes that the face will be labeled as “attractive.”  This happens even before the viewer makes a conscious decision.  His research also found that the participants' judgments of attractiveness versus unattractiveness could be manipulated by limiting the length of time they were allowed to look at a particular face. According to Shimojo, the unconscious, spontaneous movements of the eyes work in concert and affect what are presumed to be more deliberate cognitive tasks when making choices.  

Various studies in cognitive and neuro sciences have demonstrated that images—of a face, for instance—and semantic contents such as verbal labelsinteract through various mechanisms in order to produce a stable and consistent interpretation of the image.  In today’s modern surveillance society, labeling occurs in myriad ways, both benign and nefarious.  This continual labeling has far broader scope and more serious consequences than ordinary judgments of "attractive" and "unattractive," but it is perhaps influenced by some of the same subliminal forces shown in Shimojo’s work.

The lineup of "perpetrators" in this installation shows faces with labels quite contrary to the presumed task of security surveillance, which aims to identify malefactors, terrorists, criminals, dangerous subjects and other potential wrongdoers. Instead these labels, which have been loosely extrapolated from the Buddhist tenets of the ten perfections, seek to discern those with traits most useful, beneficial, lasting and constructive for society.  Although these labels are essentially positive, the viewer cannot help but approach them with a consciousness of what it is to be watched and labeled specifically, and an appreciation of the complex tensions inherent in labeling in general.

•“Gaze bias both reflects and influences preference,” Shinsuke Shimojo, Claudiu Simion, Eiko Shimojo, & Christian Scheier, Nature Neuroscience, Advance online publication, 9 November 2003; doi:10.1038/nn1150





BACK GALLERY – WURDEMANN ROOM

Blue Volumetric
Yoichi Kawamura, Shana Mabari and Shinsuke Shimojo
42” x 42” x 42” Plexiglass Cube + Mixed Materials
Price: $20,000

Description:
Throughout history, art and science have had much in common.  Both disciplines tackle a subject in depth and with great curiosity.  One uses methodic measures and recording of results, and the other uses internal intuitive reasoning to create artwork.  ‘Blue Volumetric’ is a collaborative piece among a scientist/artist and two artists immersing themselves into the Science of Vision and using art to record that work.

The piece attempts to give color another dimension.  By definition, color has three properties: hue, saturation and brightness.  Even though volumetric (3D) color is everywhere in the natural environment, such as in the sky or the water, it has been neglected relative to surface (2D) color in perceptual psychology and cognitive neuroscience.  This piece introduces volumetric, as well as temporal qualities to this unique “qualia”(a philosophical term for subjective quality) of the hue.  Steam is enclosed to give blue light space, and at the same time, the steam is constantly changing from steam to water and back to steam.  The piece is also meant to demonstrate sequential and simultaneous color contrast phenomena.

Brain Projector
Luke and Ginger Van Hook
24” x 24” x 24” Mixed Media
Price: $2500

Description:
Based on the traditional Marawa Doro Japanese Rotating Lantern, this light and space installation investigates the visual cortex as a metaphor for how the brain processes information.

Optic Chasm
Mei Xian Qiu
Dimensions Varied – Plexiglass Cube, Water, Used Motor Oil, Projector, Tempera.
Price: $ 4,200

Description:
This work is about optic illusion, the difference between what we believe is in front of us and what is actually there as a physical object.  I am interested in human perception as defined by light, shadow, and belief.  A thick slick of black oil from a '75 Chevy on a glowing liquid cube.  A  video projection that appears to move in, through, and around the cube. A serious comedy of optics, and ecological and fundamental opposites.


MAIN GALLERY

The New Zodiac
Grid of Politicians (Untitled Politician #1-6)Grid of Bunnies (Untitled Bunny #1-6)
Siri Kaur with Romann Weber and Daw-an Wu
13 x 19’’ Pigment Prints, 2010. Edition of 5.
Price: $400 each or $2000/ grid

Description:
The images were made using eye tracking software in the Shimojo laboratory at CalTech, where each image was viewed for a total of five seconds by the three collaborators. The parts of the images that are visible represent the course of the viewers’ eye movements. It’s as if their eyes became a razor, scraping out the relevant sections of each picture, charting a course of relevancy. The portions represented by the solid color and black areas reveal the portions of the pictures the viewers’ eyes neglected. Thus the images become visible maps of the way humans see the world. In five seconds or less, eyes, mouths, breasts, and flesh are what we look at first.

These cultural icons, both the politicians and pinups, were chosen by the artist for nostalgic reasons, because of their influence over her during her formative years, for better or for worse. The color palette of “Politicians”, borrowed from popular design palettes of 1960’s and 1970’s, displaces them from their typical flag backdrops; one of each color is arbitrarily assigned to each politician. The deep black ground of the “Bunnies” removes their fleshy bodies from the usual setting of sugary boudoirs.

Color Space
Ching-Ching Cheng
9"x9"x9" Urethane, Pigment
Price: $2500

Description:
Colors are inside our brain; outside is colorless because the physical environment contains only light waves. Colors that we perceive are determined not just by physical properties of light (i.e. wavelength and energy), but also physiological optics of the eye and neural processing. So any color that our eyes receive is a perception of color, as well as a psychological color. This installation aims to visualize perceptions of colors in space, which have three dimensions: color tone (first dimension), lightness (second dimension), and saturation (third dimension).

The Opposite of Love
Mei Xian Qiu
26.5 x 36.5, Lambda print, Edition of 10
Price: $850 ea.

Description:
This work explores ambiguity and intensities of emotion and intent.  How do we visually perceive love, loss, and malcontent?  A woman looks longingly or in anger? Two images of the same woman, different object in hand, one flowers, the other a gun. Her expression is the same, or is it?

MAIN GALLERY continued

Man,Woman and Revolver
Mei Xian Qiu and Meg Madison
10” x 28” Framed Chromagenic Print
Price: $

Description:
This exploration replaces  incendiary  primary imagery with words, challenging the viewer to create a complete visual context.  I am interested  with what is not in the frame as much as what is in it.  There exists for the viewer a combination of a self created visual picture from the words, what something "should" look like, subliminally borne from memory and enculturation, in the same way we create a visual memory from reading a novel, with the remaining portion of photograph (where the visual information is readily divulged).


See Thru
Marcie Kaufman
Archival Digital Prints, 2010
Price: $600

Can you trust what you feel?
Marcie Kaufman
Archival Digital Print, 2010
Price: $450

Electric
Marcie Kaufman and Krista Kahl
Archival Digital Print, 2010
Price: $450

Crossing
Marcie Kaufman and Krista Kahl
Archival Digital Print, 2010
Price: $450

Description:
Marcie Kaufman is responding to Professor Shinsuke Shimojo's work on tactile cognition--how the brain "reads" touch on the skin. At different places and positions of the body, the brain reads touch in mirror reverse.  She created photographs that make visible Shimojo's findings of invisible cognitive interpretation by drawing directly on the body, and developed poetic connections with the science behind the work.




MAIN GALLERY continued

Nostalgia
Shinsuke Shimojo & Shana Mabari
61”H x 10.5”W x 16.5”D, Mixed media (wood, brushed aluminum, goggles, flash bulb, battery).
Price: $12,000.

Description:
Where does memory exist? In the mind, the brain, or the world? We do not have a definite answer, but it should exist somewhere in our reality because otherwise, how could we sometimes be smiling or crying over a very personal mnemonic image which is years or even decades old? Memory is often tightly connected with emotional experience, as demonstrated in special phenomena such as “flash-bulb memory” phenomenon. Emotion helps to consolidate memory as well as to trigger and distort. This installation aims to “replay” such long-term dynamics of memory distortion, fading and reviving, within a frame of several seconds in flash-initiated afterimage.

Brain
Luke and Ginger Van Hook
12”L x 12”W x 12” Polycarbonate, LED Diodes, batteries, mirrored plexiglass
Price: $2500.

Description:
Transparent abstract sculpture performance that mimics the human brain. During this exhibition the “Brain” Sculpture will be born, mature, fade then die. This occurs as the LED lights burn the brightest at it’s birth, then begin to decrease in illumination as it ages, and eventually ceases to shine, culminating in its final electronic death. A birth notice is prepared in a local newspaper and an obituary notice will be recorded when it ceases its life cycle. Expected life cycle = 5 days.

Ferromagnetic Fields-LIGHT and  Ferromagnetic Fields-DARK
Luke and Ginger Van Hook
30” x  40” Photographic Digital C-Print, framed in Plexiglass
Price: $3000 ea.

Description:      
Ferrofluid is a liquid that becomes strongly magnetized in the presence of a magnetic field and is composed of nanoscaled particals of magnetite or hermatite or another compound containing iron. Invented in the late 1960s in NASA’S Apollo Program (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) ferrofluids are well known for their use in forming liquid seals and in electronic devices for computers, audiovisual equipment, some industrial applications and in medical and scientific research. Ferrofluids appear as a black fluid. They are prepared by dissolving nanoscale ferromagnetic particles in a solvent such as water or oil and remain strongly magnetic even in a fluid condition. Abstract shapes are created by the rising of spikes under a magnetic field that is controlled by electromagnets from below the surface. During a re-creation of this experiment, photographs reveal a battery operated red colored LED diode is swallowed up by the ferrofluids to form spiked shapes in mysterious configurations.
MAIN GALLERY continued

Electromagnetic Fields-First Steps and Electromagnetic Fields of Memory
Luke and Ginger Van Hook
22” x 42” Photography Darkroom C-Print, framed in plexiglass
33” x 42” Photography Darkroom C-Print, Collage framed in plexiglass
Price: $3000 ea

Description:      
The memories in our brains are invisible to the outside observer. At best, the way we have of sharing these memories is through the medium of photography. All brain activity is based on a series of electrical impulses within a neuron, which  then communicate neurochemically beyond synapses, much like our corporate culture has erected Power Towers to carry our energy and communications throughout the world. Vague perceptions, faded remembrances and filtered consciousness runs through these collages of images examining the relationship of electromagnetism to our brains, our bodies and our environment.

Streams of power lines, telephone cables, satellite transmission dishes, cell phone towers as well as electronics both inside and outside our homes run along our landscapes like the streams of consciousness run through our thoughts. Some images of memories are clear and poignant. Some images are obscured and reside in the outer edges of our consciousness; not revealing themselves yet providing the hint of a feeling one can never fully grasp like a dream that has evaporated upon wakening.

[Growing up in the late 1960’s, my sister Else and I lived in a home along Southern Blvd. and Dudlext Street in Southgate, California where rows and rows of High Voltage Power Line Towers dotted the landscape like dominos. These structures of omnipotent architectural beauty towering over our childhood, made me feel like wanting to climb up the triangular bars like the limbs of trees, but our parents warned us to stay away. These images reveal new layers of filters to my memories as we investigate the invisible powers of low-level frequency electromagnetic fields (EMF’s) and their alleged associations.]

(Ginger Van Hook, artist reflections)

Revealing the Invisible
Luke and Ginger Van Hook
15”L x 12”W x 8.5”HMagnetic Viewing Film in glass, aluminum frame. Interactive with cell phones
Price: $600

Description:      
Magnetic Viewing Film is used to show stationary or slowly-changing magnetic fields; it reveals their location and direction. It is a dark green translucent thin flexible sheet, coated with micro-capsules containing nickel flakes suspended in oil. When the “receiver” end of a cell phone is applied to the magnetic viewing film, it reveals exactly where the magnetic field is located. During this exhibition, the gallery visitor is able to interact with the art by “drawing” with their cell phones, exposing the invisible changing magnetic fields.